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Wednesday, April 17, 2013

"They Actually Eat That:" "Cheese."

Ah, Kraft. How many childhoods have been shaped by your cheesy products? Alas, many of us are still using Philadelphia cream cheese because it's just that damn good. This entry focuses on another American classic: Kraft Singles.



For those of you unaware, Kraft singles are the typical cheese slices used to make grilled cheese sandwiches. They have been popular in the States since World War II. If we recall, there are even directions on the back of the package. There are a bunch of knock-offs, too, but the Kraft Singles are really known for making grilled cheese a trend. Other sandwiches use them extensively as well...but are they really cheese?

It's a weird question, but here's the ingredients list on a package of Kraft Singles:  

"MILK, WHEY, MILK PROTEIN CONCENTRATE, MILKFAT, CONTAINS LESS THAN 2% OF CALCIUM PHOSPHATE, SALT, SODIUM CITRATE, WHEY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE, SODIUM PHOSPHATE, SORBIC ACID AS A PRESERVATIVE, CHEESE CULTURE, ENZYMES, ANNATTO AND PAPRIKA EXTRACT (COLOR), VITAMIN D3."

(Source.)
 
Note how the closest thing resembling "cheese" is the "cheese culture," and it's way at the bottom of the list. For something to qualify as cheese, it must contain at least 51% cheese. Kraft Singles are not technically cheese. Nor are "American Slices." Unless "cheese" is high on the ingredient list, it isn't cheese.

For those of you who know dairy, yes, whey is a by-product of cheesemaking. Cheesemaking itself is a pretty gross business if you don't have the stomach for slime and fungi.  Whey is the milky stuff separated from the cheese curds. It's still not cheese; it's a by-product of cheese.

Please read your cheese slices before using them in your sandwich. Using actual cheese will taste better than any not-cheese you will find, and is definitely more worth the calories. 


1 comment:

  1. A similar product would be Velveeta. Mom used to use it to make our mac and cheese. It melts easier.

    ReplyDelete