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Monday, July 15, 2013

Bio-Art: Crazy Chameleon Tattoo Ink.

Oh, tattoos. I've been told that tattoos are "edgy as a padded watermelon." The fact is, tattoos are still art, and have a lot of social significance. Over the ages, a lot of natural dyes, including cobra venom, have beenused to add designs to the relatively bland human skin. It's embarrassing that this section hasn't covered it before; how more bio-art can you get than injections of color?

Well, it turns out art has evolved with science once again. Tattoos have become more techy than ever. Conspiracies about barcodes and injected computer chips aside, tattoos are probably the most techy from of illegal art around. While some people have 3-D tattoos thanks to silicon injections, this entry will cover something far less disturbing than silicon bumps painted with boobs: blacklight tattoos.

Found on a blog, from the official site.


This is a tattoo done in Crazy Chameleon tattoo ink. The Crazy Chameleon shop is located in Pittsfield, MA. The ink, however, can be found in many local tattoo shops or ordered. It is also the number one tattoo ink that one should look for when it comes to blacklight tattoos. It is important to note that any "glow-in-the-dark" ink is not safe. Blacklight is...safer.

All blacklight tattoo inks, as well as tattoo inks in general, are not screened by any health testing ever. Crazy Chameleon ink is the exception to the rule. It is the only blacklight tattoo ink to be approved by the FDA in tracking invasive species. With everything else, one risks carcinogens and a few other nasty side-effects. Always make sure those needles are clean, too.

Crazy Chameleon ink does not use GFP, unfortunately. Instead, a fluorescent particle is coated in something called polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). PMMA is used in medicine, so it's certainly safe for human injections. Sure, it's not jellyfish DNA, but probably as close as we'll get until Batman Beyond splicing becomes a thing.

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